Category Archives: Culture

Gerald Mars and Yochanan Altman – The Cultural Bases of Soviet Georgia’s Second Economy

The primary purpose of this paper is to demonstrate, with the aid of illustrative cases, the link between the core values of Georgian culture and the working principles of its second economy. Authors aim to show that only by first understanding underlying cultural forces can we begin to grasp the reasons why Georgia, of all the Soviet Republics, should possess such a dynamic and deeply entrenched second economy.

Mars, G., & Altman, Y. (1983). The cultural bases of Soviet Georgia’s second economy. Europe‐Asia Studies, 35(4), 546-560.

Download

Austin Jersild and Neli Melkadze – The Dilemmas of Enlightenment in the Eastern Borderlands: The Theater and Library in Tbilisi

This article will illustrate that imperialism in the East included an impulse to promote and foster rather than curtail cultural expression. This made perfect sense for a Russia that was itself an eastern borderland of a Europe understood by many Russians since the 18th century to be the primary source of their own unfolding “enlightenment” and cultural progress.

Melkadze, N., & Jersild, A. (2002). The dilemmas of enlightenment in the eastern borderlands: The theater and library in Tbilisi. Kritika: Explorations in Russian and Eurasian History, 3(1), 27-49.

Download

Zaza Shatirishvili – “Old” Intelligentsia and “New” Intellectuals: The Georgian Experience

Zaza Shatirishvili takes stock of the differences and similarities between two generations of Georgian intellectuals: Old nomenclatura versus the new scholars who dominate the growing non-governmental sector.

Shatirishvili, Z. (2003, 06 26). “Old” Intelligentsia and “New” Intellectuals: The Georgian Experience. Eurozine.

Download

Paul Manning – The Epoch of Magna: Capitalist Brands and Postsocialist Revolutions in Georgia

In this article the author compares two periods of transition – from socialism to Shevardnadze and from Shevardnadze epoch to Rose Revolution. In both these periods of dramatic change, certain kinds of western symbols, especially western brands, became symbols of revolutionary change. The author is interested not the semiotics of brand as such, but the way that brand can serve as a semiotic resource to articulate these epochal changes in two somewhat different ways.

Manning, P. (2009). The epoch of Magna: capitalist brands and postsocialist revolutions in Georgia. Slavic Review, 924-945.

See on Academia.edu

Paul Manning – Rose-Colored Glasses? Color Revolutions and Cartoon Chaos in Postsocialist Georgia

The Georgian “Rose Revolution” of 2003 was preceded by events in November 2001, in which students protested against a government raid on a popular TV station, Rustavi 2, and forced then-President Shevardnadze to request the resignation of the Georgian cabinet as the students demanded. This article describes these events in detail to show how political transition in Georgia has been carried out and exemplified by new political rhetorics and metarhetoric that expressly confronted entrenched logics of reception. The article illustrates how shifts in state formation, in postsocialist contexts in particular, are tied to shifts in representational modes.

Manning, P. (2007). Rose-colored glasses? Color Revolutions and Cartoon Chaos in Postsocialist Georgia. Cultural Anthropology, 22(2), 171-213.

See on Academia.edu