Richard Bennet – Delivering on the Hope of the Rose Revolution: Public Sector Reform in Georgia, 2004-2009

Following the peaceful Rose Revolution in November 2003, Georgia President Mikheil Saakashvili and State Minister for Reform Coordination Kakha Bendukidze sought to overhaul the country’s Soviet-style bureaucracy, which had become the target of public anger. Borrowing ideas from libertarian, free-market think tanks and the New Public Management model, Bendukidze recruited a staff, eliminated redundant functions in the executive arm of government, consolidated ministries and slashed the size of the civil service. Bendukidze’s vision of limited government complemented Saakashvili’s goal of eliminating corruption by reducing opportunities for bribe taking. Although Bendukidze was instrumental in developing many of the reform policies, his office left the implementation of reforms to individual ministries. This case chronicles the steps that the Georgian government took to reorganize and consolidate its operations, capitalizing on public support in order to make rapid and bold changes.

Bennet, R. (2011). “Delivering on the Hope of the Rose Revolution: Public Sector Reform in Georgia, 2004-2009”. Princeton: Princeton University, Innovations for Successful Societies. 

Download

David Rinnert – The Politics of Civil Service and Administrative Reforms in Development—Explaining Within‐Country Variation of Reform Outcomes in Georgia after the Rose Revolution

This article examines the role of politics as a determinant of civil service and administrative (CSA) reform outcomes in Georgia. The majority of existing studies on CSA reforms face several methodological challenges, which make it difficult to understand the influence of politics in more detail. Based on literature review findings, the article proposes a model for within-country comparisons that allows one to control for a number of variables such as context and policy design.

Rinnert, D. (2015). The Politics of Civil Service and Administrative Reforms in Development—Explaining Within‐Country Variation of Reform Outcomes in Georgia after the Rose Revolution. Public Administration and Development35(1), 19-33.

Download

Kevin Tuite – Achilles and the Caucasus

In this paper author presents a symbolic cluster shared by the peoples of the western Caucasus — the Abkhazians and Georgians in particular — and two Indo-European speech communities: the Ossetes, who have lived in the central Caucasus for over two millenia, and the Greeks.

Tuite, K. 1998. Achilles and the Caucasus. Journal of Indo-European Studies. vol. 26, #3-4, 89– 343.

Download

Zaza Shatirishvili and Paul Manning – Why are the Dolls Laughing? Tbilisi Culture between “High Art” and Socialist Labor.

In the mid-1990s at least two peculiar art exhibitions were held in Tbilisi.  One of them was called chemi tojinebi (‘My Dolls’), no one can remember what the other one was called, only that it happened. What is peculiar about these exhibitions is that they were exhibitions of dolls, made by Georgian artists and intellectuals.  These exhibitions of dolls illustrate the emergent antinomies of Georgian urban life under postsocialism in several ways. What could be more dissonant than the grim realities of everyday life in Tbilisi of the mid 1990s, a period of war, chaos, poverty, gloom, and the happy childlike figure of the doll?

Shatirishvili, Z., and Manning, P. (2011). “Why are the Dolls Laughing? Tbilisi between Intelligentsia Culture and Socialist Labour”. Caucasus Paradigms: Anthropologies, Histories, and the Making of a World Area,edited by Bruce Grant & Lale Yalçın-Heckmann. Halle Studies in the Anthropology of Eurasia 13. Berlin: LIT Verlag

See on Academia.edu

Paul Manning – Love, Khevsur Style: The Romance of the Mountains and Mountaineer Romance in Georgian Ethnography

This chapter is about the romance of the mountains in Georgia, which, it could be argued, is a central Caucasian paradigm for the Georgian tradition of ethnography, since Khevsureti is the central focus of Georgian ethnograhy, the place in which exemplary Georgians are also exemplary Caucasian mountaineers. Secondly, this chapter is about another Caucasian paradigm, namely, the imagined and real relationship between the indigenou intelligentsia and ‘people’, as figured in the ‘Romance of the Khevsurs’. Lastly, this raises an consideration of how Georgian (and generally East European) ethnography differs from American and British anthropology in that it is not epistemically predicated  on an assumption on essential alterity but on essential identity.

Manning, P. (2007). Love Khevsur Style: The Romance of the Mountains and Mountaineer Romance in Georgian Ethnography. Caucasus Paradigms: Anthropologies, Histories, and the Making of a World Area, edited by Bruce Grant & Lale Yalçın-Heckmann, pp. 23–46. Halle Studies in the Anthropology of Eurasia 13. Berlin: LIT Verlag

See on dangerserviceagency.org