Author Archives: Irakli Gunia

Paul Manning and Zaza Shatirishvili – The Exotocism and Eroticism of the City: The “Kinto” and his City

At the center of the postsocialist mythological space of Old Tbilisi there are two 19th century figures, the kinto (Georgian k’int’o, the urban street peddler) and the qarachogheli (urban guild craftsman). Once upon a time there were part of a living cityscape; under postsocialism they exist only as isolated fragments of an exploded chronotope of Old Tbilisi.. The methodology authors use in this paper is a mixture of ethnographic, semiotic, historical and literary methodologies, as befits the interdisciplinarity of the authors and the historicity of the materials.

Manning, P. and Shatirishvili, Z. (2011). The Exoticism and Eroticism of the City: The ‘Kinto’ and his City. In Darieva, T., Katschuba, W., and Krebs, M. (Eds). Urban Spaces after Socialism: Ethnographies of Public Plces in Eurasian Cities. Frankfurt: Campus Verlag, pp. 261-281.

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Helga Kotthoff – Communicating Affect in Intercultural Lamentations in Caucasian Georgia

Oral lamentation rituals have been frequently studies by anthropologists, ethnolinguists and cultural sociologists, and they play important roles in many cultures. In Georgia, these mourning ceremonies are called xmit natirlebi (literally “crying with the voice”); the one who ritually cries is the motirali. the women of the family and neighbourhood of the deceased gather around the coffin and in lamenting they repeatedly appeal to the dead person, address him/her or one another using special exclamation formats, eulogise the deceased, those present and those who have dies long before. Neighbours, colleagues and distant relatives at some point join in the ceremony and take turns in performing mourning improvisations.

Kotthoff, H. (2006). Communicating affect in intercultural lamentations in Caucasian Georgia. In Buhrig and J. D. ten Thije (eds.). Beyond Misunderstanding. pp. 289-311. Amsterdam: Benjamins.

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Kevin Tuite – “Antimarriage” in Ancient Georgian Society

In this paper author will demonstrate that the Svans, who speak a Kartvelian language distantly related to Georgian, preserve a structurally-comparable ritual the designation of which — ch’æch’-il-ær — is formed from a root cognate with that of c’ac’-l-oba. On the basis of a comparative analysis of the Svan and Pshav-Xevsurian practices in the context of traditional Georgian beliefs concerning marriage and relationships between “in-groups” and “out-groups”, author will propose a reconstruction of the significance of *c´’ac´’-al- “anti-marriage” in prehistoric
Kartvelian social thought.

Tuite, K. 2000. “Antimarriage” in Ancient Georgian Society. Anthropological Linguistics 42 (1): 37–60.

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Florian Mühlfried – Celebrating Identities in Post-Soviet Georgia

In the following pages, author intend to investigate further the reasons for and consequences of the »supra-turn« in Georgian culture and politics. Accordingly, some contextual knowledge must be elaborated. Author will start by defining the supra and explaining its role in the maintenance of Georgian national identity over the past hundred years.

Mühlfried, F. (2007). “Celebrating Identities in Post-Soviet Georgia”. In Representations on the Margins of Europe. Politics and Identities in the Baltic and South Caucasian States, ed. by Tsypylma Darieva and Wolfgang Katshuba. Frankfurt am Main, New York, 282-300.

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Paul Manning – Folklore and Terror in Georgia’s ‘Notorious’ Pankisi Gorge: The Ethnography of State Violence at the Margins of the Nation

One of the more curious side effects of the “branding” of localities in the War on Terror was the production of certain kinds of fantastic places, such that certain otherwise unremarkable places came to be diagnosed as “Terror bases.” This chapter explores a curious dual apperception of this place within two “folkloric” discourses. Within the discourse of Georgian folklore, Pankisi is at best peripheral, within the discourse of the Folklore of Terror, Pankisi briefly became central. Finally, author show how the peripherality of Pankisi to “the nation,” and centrality to “terror,” became a resource of legitimate violence for the Georgian State.

Manning, P. (2008). Folklore and Terror in Georgia’s ‘Notorious’ Pankisi Gorge: The ethnography of state violence at the margins of the nation. In Cultural Archetypes and Political changes in the Caucasus, eds. Nino Tsitsishvili and Sergey Arutiunov. Nova Science Publishers Inc.

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