Category Archives: History

Rebecca Gould – Aleksandre Qazbegi’s Mountaineer Prosaics: The Anticolonial Vernacular on Georgian–Chechen Borderlands

The Georgian writer Aleksandre Qazbegi (1848-1893) is notable for the anticolonial themes that were inspired by the seven years he passed among as a mountaineer. Drawing on ethnography to advance expressive possibilities of prose, Qazbegi’s literary aesthetic challenged prior poetic norms, while using vernacular realism to pioneer a new prosaic form. This essay examines the conjunctures of ethnography, prosaics, and the literary imagination to consider how Qazbegi rendered mountaineer life on Georgian-Chechen borderlands.

Gould, R. (2014). Aleksandre Qazbegi’s Mountaineer Prosaics: The Anticolonial Vernacular on Georgian–Chechen Borderlands. Ab Imperio2014(1), 361-390.

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Rebecca Gould – Georgian Literary Modernism: Poems by Titsian Tabidze, Paolo Iashvili and Galaktion Tabidze

This feature section, originally published in the literary journal Metamorphoses, introduces the poets Titsian Tabidze, Galaktion Tabidze, and Paolo Iashvili to an English readership. These three major exponents of the Georgian Literary Modernism were all either executed (Titsian) or committed suicide (Paolo and Galaktion) as a result of Stalin’s and Beria’s repressive policies. Collectively, these texts movingly testify to the intimate relation between politics and poetics in Georgian literature, as in other literatures of the former Soviet Union. An introduction called “The Twlight of Georgian Literary Modernism” is followed by the original Georgian texts and English translations of the following poems — Titsian Tabidze: “Gunib,” “Galaktion Tabidze,” “Sergei Esenin,” “Black Sea,” “Bandits Killed Me on the Banks of the Aragvi,” “My Village in Spring,”; Paolo Iashvili: “From the Heights,” “My Table – My Parnassus,” “Poetry”; Galaktion Tabidze: “Exile,” “Amirani.” “Blue Horses.”

Gould, R. (2009). Georgian Literary Modernism: Poems by Titsian Tabidze, Paolo Iashvili and Galaktion Tabidze. Metamorphosis: A Journal of Literary Translation, 17(1), 66-103.

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Robert P. Blake, Georgian Secular Literature: Epic, Romance, and Lyric (1100-1800)

Georgian secular literature is almost as untrodden a field as Georgian theological production during the Middle Ages. While rather more secular texts have been published, only one of these has come out in a critical edition 1 and a number of the most important documents have been handled in a manner that is lamentably inadequate. What has been written on the subject is widely scattered, veiled in recondite tongues, and most of the studies have been distorted by being seen through nationalist spectacles.

Blake R. P. (1933). Georgian Secular Literature: Epic, Romance, and Lyric (1100-1800). Harvard Studies and Notes in Philology and Literature. 

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Zurab Avalishvili – T’eimuraz and his poem: The Martyrdom of Queen K’et’evan

The importance of the poem in Georgian literature is indisputable. I t is probably the first example of a poetical treatment of a lively historical Georgian theme-no small achievement of T’eimuraz’s poetic talent.

Avalishvili, Z. (1937). T’eimuraz and his poem: The Martyrdom of Queen K’et’evan. Georgica : A Journal of Georgian and Caucasian Studies.

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Natalie Sabanadze – Globalization and Nationalism: The Cases of Georgia and the Basque Country

Argues for an original, unorthodox conception about the relationship between globalization and contemporary nationalism. While the prevailing view holds that nationalism and globalization are forces of clashing opposition, Sabanadze establishes that these tend to become allied forces. Acknowledges that nationalism does react against the rising globalization and represents a form of resistance against globalizing influences, but the Basque and Georgian cases prove that globalization and nationalism can be complementary rather than contradictory tendencies.

Nationalists have often served as promoters of globalization, seeking out globalizing influences and engaging with global actors out of their very nationalist interests. In the case of both Georgia and the Basque Country, there is little evidence suggesting the existence of strong, politically organized nationalist opposition to globalization.

Discusses why, on a broader scale, different forms of nationalism develop differing attitudes towards globalization and engage in different relationships.

Sabanadze, N. (2010). Globalization and Nationalism: The Cases of Georgia and the Basque country. Central European University Press.

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